I’ve had my share of roommates in life. One of them is still one of my very favorite people in the whole wide world and I don’t see her often enough. The rest, though? Well, I could take them or leave them. Definitely leave some most of them. 
So yeah, at the ripe, old age of 27, I decided to try the whole living alone thing, and I’m about two months into that decision. Almost everyday, someone asks me how I’m liking it, and because there are good things and bad things about it, I never really know how to answer.
So I’ll blog about it instead.
PROS
It’s a Judgment-Free Zone
Almost everyone has said, “Now you can walk around naked whenever you want!” And sure, that’s true, but as someone with a pretty severe anxiety disorder, I’m more pleased about the fact that I can do whatever whenever I want without worrying about what someone else thinks.
I mean, the only people around these parts who could judge me are my dogs and my cat, and please. If they want to think less of me for drinking straight from the milk carton or not showering until well after noon on my days off or picking my nose, they can suck it. 
I’ve seen those guys eat their own feces.
Things Stay Exactly Where I Put Them
I know that includes dirty dishes and the hair that clogs the drain and the trash. But it also includes everything else. 
Like, the food I buy at the grocery store isn’t going to magically disappear 20 minutes after I buy it (unless it’s peanut butter; I just can’t help myself). 
The remote will be in the chair where I left it when I’m ready to watch bad TV again.
The library books I left lying on the counter won’t get thrown in a heap on my bed when my housemate gets tired of looking at them. 
So yeah, I can deal with a little drain hair.
There’s No One to Fight With
Oh, man do I hate confrontation. I think that was the worst part about living with other people. If they did something to annoy me or I did something to annoy them, a confrontation was inevitable, so I’d just sit around in an anxious fit waiting to have it out and trying not to cry.
Now that I live all by myself, I’ve eliminated at ton of confrontation and I have all sorts of time to worry about other things like what my neighbor thinks of me and how likely it is that the the weird guy who walks his dog at midnight is actually a serial killer staking out my house.
CONS
Well, Yeah. Sometimes It’s Lonely
I’ve grown accustomed to being alone. That’s what happens when you’ve got social anxiety disorder. However, I need a little social stimulation now and again, and having one-sided conversations with my pets doesn’t cut it.
Neither do chit-chatting with my neighbors at the mailbox, making small talk with my cashier at the grocery store or obsessively texting my friends about the dumbest things ever. 
I still haven’t quite figured out how to fix this one.
It’s Hella Expensive
My mortgage takes up like a third of my check y’all! Then there’s a car payment all those utilities and the high-speed internet I HAVE TO HAVE. And when you live alone, there’s no one to split it with. 
I don’t know about the rest of y’all, but I like having money to piss away at the movie theater and the bookstore and The Shoe Department. But that’s kind of hard to do when I end up having to throw away three-fourths a loaf of bread because I bought it and ate two grilled cheese sandwiches before forgetting about it and letting it mold to a super disgusting shade of purplish-red. 
There’s So Much Empty Space
I mean. It’s kind of cool that I have this entire house to myself and I can put whatever the heck I want in the spare rooms and on the walls and what have you.
But man, if you think utilities are expensive, you should see the price of wall decorations. And while I’ve got a small collection of decorations, they’re about 10 years old and don’t exactly scream “independent woman.” Also, I don’t have enough to fill up an entire HOUSE, and with all the those utilities I’ve got to pay, I’m never going to. 

I’ve had my share of roommates in life. One of them is still one of my very favorite people in the whole wide world and I don’t see her often enough. The rest, though? Well, I could take them or leave them. Definitely leave some most of them. 

So yeah, at the ripe, old age of 27, I decided to try the whole living alone thing, and I’m about two months into that decision. Almost everyday, someone asks me how I’m liking it, and because there are good things and bad things about it, I never really know how to answer.

So I’ll blog about it instead.

PROS

It’s a Judgment-Free Zone

Almost everyone has said, “Now you can walk around naked whenever you want!” And sure, that’s true, but as someone with a pretty severe anxiety disorder, I’m more pleased about the fact that I can do whatever whenever I want without worrying about what someone else thinks.

I mean, the only people around these parts who could judge me are my dogs and my cat, and please. If they want to think less of me for drinking straight from the milk carton or not showering until well after noon on my days off or picking my nose, they can suck it. 

I’ve seen those guys eat their own feces.

Things Stay Exactly Where I Put Them

I know that includes dirty dishes and the hair that clogs the drain and the trash. But it also includes everything else. 

Like, the food I buy at the grocery store isn’t going to magically disappear 20 minutes after I buy it (unless it’s peanut butter; I just can’t help myself). 

The remote will be in the chair where I left it when I’m ready to watch bad TV again.

The library books I left lying on the counter won’t get thrown in a heap on my bed when my housemate gets tired of looking at them. 

So yeah, I can deal with a little drain hair.

There’s No One to Fight With

Oh, man do I hate confrontation. I think that was the worst part about living with other people. If they did something to annoy me or I did something to annoy them, a confrontation was inevitable, so I’d just sit around in an anxious fit waiting to have it out and trying not to cry.

Now that I live all by myself, I’ve eliminated at ton of confrontation and I have all sorts of time to worry about other things like what my neighbor thinks of me and how likely it is that the the weird guy who walks his dog at midnight is actually a serial killer staking out my house.

CONS

Well, Yeah. Sometimes It’s Lonely

I’ve grown accustomed to being alone. That’s what happens when you’ve got social anxiety disorder. However, I need a little social stimulation now and again, and having one-sided conversations with my pets doesn’t cut it.

Neither do chit-chatting with my neighbors at the mailbox, making small talk with my cashier at the grocery store or obsessively texting my friends about the dumbest things ever. 

I still haven’t quite figured out how to fix this one.

It’s Hella Expensive

My mortgage takes up like a third of my check y’all! Then there’s a car payment all those utilities and the high-speed internet I HAVE TO HAVE. And when you live alone, there’s no one to split it with. 

I don’t know about the rest of y’all, but I like having money to piss away at the movie theater and the bookstore and The Shoe Department. But that’s kind of hard to do when I end up having to throw away three-fourths a loaf of bread because I bought it and ate two grilled cheese sandwiches before forgetting about it and letting it mold to a super disgusting shade of purplish-red. 

There’s So Much Empty Space

I mean. It’s kind of cool that I have this entire house to myself and I can put whatever the heck I want in the spare rooms and on the walls and what have you.

But man, if you think utilities are expensive, you should see the price of wall decorations. And while I’ve got a small collection of decorations, they’re about 10 years old and don’t exactly scream “independent woman.” Also, I don’t have enough to fill up an entire HOUSE, and with all the those utilities I’ve got to pay, I’m never going to. 

  1. thatswhatcristahsaid posted this